In my home network/lab, I was previously using a 24 ports Cisco 2960 as the breakout switch from my LAB into my LAN. It was later replaced to a 24 ports Cisco 3550 L3 switch. Problem was, believe it or not, I started running short on ports.

Besides, I was also missing Juniper switches in my lab so it was just a matter of time before getting one. I just had to decide between getting the one 48 ports switch, or two 24 ports switch.

There are benefits in having two and being able to configure a virtual chassis, was just one of those.

So here is how my Lab/Home network switching physical topology looks like now.

virtual-chassis-01

In this diagram, my two Juniper EX 2200 switches are depicted at the bottom. You can see that I’m using the first two ports, ge-0/0/0 and ge-0/0/1 as the VCP ports.

Here is how my configuration looks like:

screenshot261

  • preprovisioned – this keyword is mandatory when configuring VC in pre-provisioned mode
  • no-split-detection – this is optional in the sense that JunOS will not “complain” if you omit it. However, this is recommendable in this case, as explained in Part I
  • we are then tying each member switch to a specific role, based on the serial number

You can see below the actual set commands:

screenshot266

You can get the serial-numbers for each swich using the following command:

screenshot260

Notice you are seeing here the SNs for both switches since they are already clustered.

Also notice that both switches are set to be routing-engines – so which one is the primary and which one is the backup routing engine? The answer to this question is given in the Part I – see the Election Process

To configure the actual VCP ports, I used the following commands:

run request virtual-chassis vc-port set pic-slot 0 port 0
run request virtual-chassis vc-port set pic-slot 0 port 1 


Next, let’s take a look at some verification commands…

show virtual-chassis – an brief overview of the current virtual-chassis status

screenshot267

show virtual-chassis protocol (…) – I mentioned in part I that VCCP cannot be configured; we can however use this command tho check adjacencies, stats, etc.

screenshot270

show virtual-chassis vc-path (…) – this can be very useful in specific troubleshooting scenarios. You specify a source and destination interface and the output shows you the how many and which hops are used when switching the frame.

screenshot272

show virtual-chassis vc-port – to display the VCP ports. Below you can see that one of the VC-Ports is down; this is because I have only connected ports g-0/0/1 on each switch.

screenshot273

Interesting to see is also the output of the show interface terse command:

screenshot274

Notice how ge-0/0/0 & ge-0/0/1 have disappeared; they have been now replaced by the VCP ports.

 


Thank you,
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